ICR ROAD MOVIE

ICR ROAD MOVIE

 ICR RESEARCH STUDY

ICR RESEARCH STUDY

 B.O.A.T. PROJECT

B.O.A.T. PROJECT

 THE MARGATE SCHOOL

THE MARGATE SCHOOL


ICR Research Study

UWE DERKSEN

Culture-led Regeneration in Folkestone and Margate

My research relates to the hopes, ambitions and actions of the people and stakeholders of Folkestone and Margate, about their respective towns and their futures as a place to live and work, how regeneration measures and specifically cultural investment and efforts might make a difference. A lot of consultancy work has been generated across the globe that has written the benefits of ‘culture’ on their banners. Academic studies, too, sometimes merging the two, have focused on the connection between culture and urban regeneration and economic development. The vast majority of these have been pitched at national or large conurbation levels, with the possibility of drawing on large official secondary data. Some of these ideas, be it advocacy or analytical or both (as an example see Wood and Taylor, 2004), have filtered down to local regeneration agendas, including Folkestone and Margate. In the latter case, research has been more than scarce. This makes the task at hand even more challenging, given that I am not primarily interested in the influences of, though not ignorant of it, national policy and economic structural shift towards a ‘creative economy’, as some refer to the current nature of economy.

My research, much more humble in nature, has begun to map different perceptions, experiences and ideas about these seaside places of Folkestone and Margate, and begun to identify some subtle differences in their respective approach to culture within the measures of regeneration in the two towns. Inevitably at this stage of the research much of the work remains at a descriptive level, though “a good description of the problem is half the explanation” to paraphrase Dewey and others. The problem area, that is the levels of deprivation in two seaside towns and the level of investment into the idea of cultural remedies, seems clear enough, but that, admittedly, does not quite equate to ‘the problem’ nor the likely explanation to be on offer.

My role as academic researcher cannot be separated from my own personal and professional involvement in these towns. In some ways I am part of the people, hopes etc in itself and of course as the object of study for itself, whilst, through my evolving research, there may be the opening of avenues in and for itself. (‘Avenues’ have been a useful addition to British seaside towns in the 20th century as American-modelled self-contained grids along the coast-line with routes into social and economic centres, thus instilling a sense of arrival!). Nor should it be ignored that institutionalised research cultures and structures are not always accommodating to some other personal circumstances which ‘inevitably’ have had a stamp on my research approach; the fact that I had to juggle my more than ‘full-time’ job (with its concomitant yet not necessarily predictable pressures) with the demands of a ‘as practically and academically appropriate as possible research approach’. For my research this has meant in part to prioritise the empirical data collection because of the particular opportunities that became available to me at the time.

For a social researcher, especially when engaged in what one might call a ‘meso-level’ of analysis, it is crucial to understand his or her position in the research process and to tread carefully within the web of subjects targeted for analysis, acknowledge knowledge co-contribution, be is as indicators or be it  te form of novel or particular insights. In the end, the question for the type of research I am conducting will first and foremost be, what contribution have the findings and interpretations actually made to the regeneration debate at our very local level? Here the interest is of practical concern, ‘practical reason’ one might say, and the not to be underestimated task in hand is to show how certain levels of abstraction can still be of practical relevance, thus adding to the ontological debate theoretically and practically. So, within the responsibility of the researcher resides the ‘ability to respond’. A theory must therefore seek, within it, to draft a communicative syntax, which makes its applicability, if it does not want to remain on the plane of pure analysis, a real possibility, without of course being subsumed into the syntax of the object of study itself. Now, the concomitant task at hand is the theoretical framing of the research process. This task has to be a reiterative process, especially when considering the fact that there is not only very limited research available on the towns on Folkestone and Margate and seaside towns more generally or indeed the regeneration of smaller towns. Though size is of relevance here, it does not mean having to choose between sociological theories at macro structural or micro agency level. To insist, especially at this stage of the research, to ‘pin ones colours’ to the flags of one theoretical school or another would only be an invitation ‘to view every phenomena as a nail because the chosen theoretical tool is a hammer’ to paraphrase Kaplan or Maslow, not unless one subscribes to the idea that empirical research needs to be driven through the lens of theoretical constructs in order to subject it to the possibility of falsification. On the other hand, the reverse is true too, it would be misleading to dismiss theoretical approaches around property relations (Zukin, 1982) or ‘creative class’ (Florida, 2004) out of hand. There is clearly evidence that property interest, representing capital, has an important role to play in the constellation of regeneration efforts and how the cultural stakeholders have become caught up in it. There are also clear differences between Folkestone and Margate, partially due to historical developments and partially through the ‘philanthropic’ interest of a particular individual. However, to transpose analytical study of  New York loft properties (or London, Newcastle or Liverpool for that matter) to that of Folkestone and Margate will be of limited use, especially since the economic pressures of property investment is considerably different in most British seaside resorts to the global and capital cities of the Western societies, at least from the 70s onwards. Similarly, it is of little doubt that the gravitational pull of the cultural preferences, engagement and investments of professional people generate in specific locations can contribute in significant ways in urban regeneration efforts (with or without the multiplier (or indeed displacement) effects to other occupational groups and residents) , but it is by no means clear what the contribution might be to small seaside towns and over what period of time. There is some evidence around the reasons why professionals locate in smaller town, which include factors such as “proximity to the metropolis”, “the absence of a blue-collar legacy”, cultural industries “heavily subsidised by or organised around public institutions”, “certain types of urban and natural amenities” as well as the “level of elderly population” with disposable income for cultural consumption (see Denis-Jacob, 2012). But these descriptions only tell part of the ‘story.

 Margate and Folkestone, two seaside towns with slightly different histories, have been in social and economic decline over a period of time, certainly since the 70s, which has resulted in high unemployment levels and higher than average deprivation. Since the 90s various regeneration efforts had only limited effect. The idea of ‘culture’ as a regeneration driver or tool was taken on board within the narratives of both towns by various stakeholders. My research focusses on a) the deconstruction of those narratives and b) the effect of the different power figurations of the two towns, as one (Folkestone) has a significant financial and conceptual input via a philanthropist and the other (Margate) has a somewhat  different figuration.  My research questions, target groups and approach (see the Table 1 below) reflect this understanding. However, Margate is not necessarily a counter factual to Folkestone or vice versa, but the towns provide a good comparison of possible different figurations whilst both referencing  culture in their respective regeneration efforts.

 

The four questions that are guiding my research provide an overview when associated with the research methods employed so far:

Research Question - 1. What are the narratives about cultural regeneration in Folkestone and Margate? (includes factors considered to require regeneration)

METHOD

  • Literature review
  • Review of public policy and other documents
  • Review of media
  • Flâneur/psycho-geographic walk
  • Online survey
  • Interviews

TARGET GROUP

  • Local Residents and general business owners
  • Visitors and Leisure industry
  • Media/experts
  • Decision makers/Leaders/ opinion makers
  • Operational Actors

Research Question - 2. Are the regeneration narratives that refer to the creative and cultural industries compared to other investments?

METHOD

  • Literature review
  • Review of public policy and other documents
  • Review of media
  • Online survey
  • Interviews

TARGET GROUP

  • Local Residents and general business owners
  • Visitors and Leisure industry
  • Media/experts
  • Decision makers/Leaders/ opinion makers
  • Operational Actors

Research Question - 3. What is the actual level of influence that the creative and cultural industries have on the regeneration of the two seaside towns?

METHOD

  • Literature review
  • Review of public policy and other documents
  • Review of media
  • Online survey
  • Interviews

TARGET GROUP

  • Decision makers/Leaders/ opinion makers
  • Operational Actors
  • Media/experts

Research Question - 4. What are the differences between privately (philanthropic) and public supported culture-led regeneration?

METHOD

  • Literature review
  • Review of public policy and other documents
  • Interviews

TARGET GROUP

  • Decision makers/
  • Leaders/ opinion makers
  • Operational Actors
  • Media/experts

A lot of the research approach here operates at a cognitive level, and it is surprising that not more sociological research makes use of our full range of senses to fully appreciate the manifestations of social relations in space and time. The limitation, maybe similar to a captain who never manoeuvres her ship beyond the safety of the harbour walls, can be addressed in part by walking, in this case, the streets of the towns of study, engaging in spontaneous conversations, observing the historical fabric, ‘warming up’ the inquisitive mind. The Flâneur role, possibly with nostalgic references to the likes of Rousseau and Goethe as well as the narratives emerging in the towns themselves (see Jarvis and Bonnett, 2013), whilst having a self-critical awareness of the male gaze or surveillance of public spaces, can be balanced by semi-structured explorative group walks, the so-called ‘psycho-geographic walk’, which can result in rich observations (without necessarily becoming ethnographic research) and animated dialogues. For my research I use both approaches to inform the survey and interview questions, data analysis and interpretation, and ultimately to create a better ‘feel’ for the subject matter. “The key lies not in reproducing romantic urban nomadism …, but in generating ‘anywheres’ … as a conceptual (and mutable) tool kit for a widening affordance to be added to and subtracted from, according to practical and theoretical needs, both an art of memory and an actual, physical, memorialized landscape; both the assassination of the situationist corpse and the survival kit for avoiding its fate, the ‘head shotthat finally puts not the corpse but the necessity to keep murdering it to sleep, that repeatedly defers our meeting with it, a training for more portentous and more perilous trajectories”.  (Smith 2010: 120)

It is the conviction of the author that sociological investigation must constitute itself as a reiterative process (as already mentioned above), approaching the subject matter via different approaches (despite the challenges), embrace reality without being inhibited or indeed intimidated by theoretical or methodological precepts (though not ignorant of them), the application in itself being a learning process (the motto ‘learning by doing’ is no less inappropriate here than when applied to the learning of a bicycle).  Through this reiterative process it will be possible to build up a meaningful mosaic of the findings generated through the range of research approaches employed. At the heart of that mosaic or map are the interdependencies and the resultant ‘unintentional interdependencies’ (Elias 1978: 94) of the subject matter. “These people make up webs of interdependence or figurations of many kinds, characterised by power balances of many sorts, such as families, schools, towns, social strata, or states” (ibid: 15) over a period of time. It will be by mapping out the narratives against the four lead questions that a “field” (Bourdieu, 1998) of “functional nexuses” (Elias, 1978) will emerge together with an assessment as to the increase or decrease of ‘functional differentiation or integration’.  The extent, if at all, the narratives form part of the different figurations, will be worked through and will help in developing of hypotheses.  Sub-questions such as  “are Margate and Folkestone an ‘object of common identification’? How do people bond to them”. Or “does  the reference to culture on the one hand hide the true tasks of regeneration but on the other serve a useful function in binding people’s effort? And if so to what extent? “  This analysis will help in the attempt to reveal unknown relationships! Following Elias the aim is to build up a picture of how the previous figuration led to or was the necessary condition for the current figuration and how these are experienced in the different towns. The model of figuration puts people and their relationships at the centre, and only out of those relationships can change be understood pointing to functional nexuses and power relations. “Who were, are and are becoming the influential groups in these towns and what are the structural tensions?” Though Elias’ aim to ‘understand in order to control social relations’ (a transposition from the idea that the purpose of the natural sciences is to control nature) may now be regarded as somewhat naïve or misplaced, the utilisation of a ‘tool’ that can capture the structure of social change at various levels however, without necessarily getting into an apriori debate about ‘structure versus action’ or discussions around functional nodes working towards a ‘harmonious system’, are particularly helpful to my research.  ”… configurational analysis and synopsis, form an integral part of many sociological enquiries. They play a part for example in the building of models on the largest as well as the smallest scale … they can be found in the development, the making and revising of  sociological hypothesis and theories” (Elias, 1994: 8)

‘Agency’ within the analysis of data and narratives here,  can usefully  be captured through Bourdieu’s concept of ‘habitus’: “ … the space of social positions is retranslated into a space of position-takings through the mediation of the space of dispositions (or habitus)” (1998: 7).  Especially in the regenerational context of an anticipated (better) future as an emerging narrative with self-regulatory effect, the dynamic habitus concept can be usefully  employed: “The habitus contains the solution to the paradoxes of objective meaning without subjective intention … If each stage in the sequence of ordered and orientated actions that constitute objective strategies can appear to be determined by anticipation of the future, and in particular of its own consequences …, it is because the practices that are generated by the habitus and are governed by the past conditions of production of their generative principle are adapted in advance to the objective conditions whenever the conditions in which the habitus functions have remained identical, or similar, to the conditions in which it was constituted. Perfectly and immediately successful adjustment to the objective conditions provides the most complete illusion of finality, or – which amounts to the same thing – of self-regulating mechanism” (Bourdieu, 1990: 62).

The issue of confining the subject matter to such an extent that it is still possibly to talk in a meaningful way about the subject matter without succumbing to generalized theories of social forces of which localized indices are simply representative, whilst avoiding a level of particularism which would make sociological analysis superfluous, makes the sociological approaches of Elias and Bourdieu an appropriate tool for my research.  For an interesting comparison of Elias and Bourdieu see Paulle, van Heerikhuizen and Emirbayer, 2012.

At this stage of my research, for practical and ‘research as praxis’ reasons, has been, what one may call ‘theoretically tentative’.  Much of the theoretical literature around urban regeneration cannot be  simply rejected or indeed fully applied to the social figurations of Folkestone and Margate, though aspects clearly need to be referenced , such as issues around governance of urban development (“the notion of governance has become critical” Jones and Evans, 2006, p. 1492), out of town retail parks and the effect on towns centres (Thomas and Bromley, 2002), housing (Waddington, 2005) and the unfamiliar  (McGuinness et al., 2012),  nostalgia of the place  (Jarvis and Bonnett, 2013) or planning innovation  (Nyseth, Pl\oger and Holm, 2010) or indeed the language of regeneration itself  (Harrison, 2013).


References

Bourdieu, P. (1990). The logic of practice. 1st ed. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.

Bourdieu, P. (1998). Practical reason. 1st ed. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.

Bourdieu, P. and Wacquant, L. (1992). An invitation to reflexive sociology. 1st ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Denis-Jacob, J. (2012). Cultural Industries in Small-sized Canadian Cities Dream or Reality?. Urban Studies, 49(1), pp.97--114.

Elias, N. (1978). What is sociology?. 1st ed. New York: Columbia University Press.

Elias, N. (1994). The established and the outsiders. 1st ed. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications.

Florida, R. (2004) The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books.

Harrison, E. (2013). Bouncing back? Recession, resilience and everyday lives. Critical Social Policy, 33(1), pp.97--113.

Jarvis, H. and Bonnett, A. (2013). Progressive Nostalgia in Novel Living Arrangements: A Counterpoint to Neo-traditional New Urbanism?. Urban Studies, 50(11), pp.2349--2370.

Jones, P. and Evans, J. (2006). Urban regeneration, governance and the state: Exploring notions of distance and proximity. Urban Studies, 43(9), pp.1491--1509.

McGuinness, D., Greenhalgh, P., Davidson, G., Robinson, F. and Braidford, P. (2012). Swimming against the tide: A study of a neighbourhood trying to rediscover its ‘reason for being--the case of South Bank, Redcar and Cleveland. Local Economy, 27(3), pp.251--264.

Nyseth, T., Pl\oger, J. and Holm, T. (2010). Planning beyond the horizon: The Troms\o experiment.Planning Theory, 9(3), pp.223--247.

Paulle, B., van Heerikhuizen, B. and Emirbayer, M. (2012). Elias and Bourdieu. Journal of Classical Sociology, 12(1), pp.69--93.

Paulle, B., van Heerikhuizen, B. and Emirbayer, Jarvis, H. and Bonnett, A. (2013). Progressive Nostalgia in Novel Living Arrangements: A Counterpoint to Neo-traditional New Urbanism?. Urban Studies, 50(11), pp.2349--2370.

Smith, P. (2010). The contemporary dérive: a partial review of issues concerning the contemporary practice of psychogeography. Cultural Geographies 17, pp. 103-121

Thomas, C. and Bromley, R. (2002). The changing competitive relationship between small town centres and out-of-town retailing: town revival in South Wales. Urban Studies, 39(4), pp.791--817.

Wacquant, L. (2006). PIERRE BOURDIEU. In : R.  Stones (ed) Key contemporary thinkers Komp. Soc. forår 2011 bd.2. 1st ed. London: Macmillan.

Waddington, D. (2005). ‘With a little help from our friends: The role of new solidarities and alliances in the remaking of Warsop Vale. Capital \& Class, 29(3), pp.201--225.

Wood, P. and Taylor, C. (2004). Big ideas for a small town: the Huddersfield creative town initiative. Local Economy, 19(4), pp.380--395.

Zukin, S. (1982) Loft Living: Culture and Capital in Urban Change. Baltimore: JohnHopkins University Press.

UWE DERKSEN

La culture au cœur de la revitalisation à Folkestone et Margate

Mes recherches portent sur les espérances, les ambitions et les actions des personnes et des parties prenantes de Folkestone et de Margate, avec un intérêt particulier sur l’avenir de ces villes en tant que lieux de résidence et de travail et sur la manière dont les mesures prises en matière de revitalisation et l’investissement et les efforts culturels peuvent faire la différence.

Bon nombre de travaux de consultation à l’échelle internationale ont répertorié en détails les avantages liés à l’agitation du drapeau culturel. Les études universitaires se sont elles aussi penchées sur les liens qui unissent la culture, la revitalisation urbaine et le développement économique. La grande majorité de ces études ciblait le niveau national ou de grandes conurbations, souvent avec la possibilité de s’inspirer de vastes quantités de données officielles secondaires. Certaines de ces idées (voir par exemple Wood et Taylor, 2004) ont été transférées dans les programmes de revitalisation locale, notamment à Folkestone et Margate. Dans le cas de Margate, la recherche était très limitée, ce qui rend la tâche à effectuer encore plus difficile. Bien que j’en sois conscient, je ne suis pas particulièrement intéressé par les influences des glissements de politique nationale et de structure économique vers une « économie créative », car certaines font référence à la nature actuelle de l’économie.

Ma recherche, bien plus modeste par nature, a commencé par dresser la liste de différentes perceptions, expériences et idées à propos des villes côtières de Folkestone et Margate. Elle a commencé par identifier certaines différences subtiles dans leurs approches respectives de la culture en lien avec la revitalisation dans les deux villes. Inéluctablement, à ce stade de la recherche, la majeure partie du travail n’en est qu’à un niveau descriptif, même si « une bonne description du problème constitue une demi-explication », pour paraphraser Dewey et d’autres. La problématique concernant les niveaux de privation dans deux villes côtières et le niveau d’investissement dans l’idée de remèdes culturels semble suffisamment claire, mais, certes, n’est pas vraiment équivalente à la « problématique » ni à l’explication susceptible d’être apportée.

Il est impossible de séparer mon rôle en tant que chercheur universitaire de mon propre engagement personnel et professionnel dans ces villes. D’une certaine manière, je fais partie des gens, de leurs espérances, etc. On ne doit pas perdre de vue que les cultures et les structures de recherche institutionnalisées ne s’adaptent pas toujours aux circonstances personnelles, un fait qui a eu un effet inéluctable sur l’approche de ma recherche. J’ai dû cumuler mon emploi plus qu’à temps plein avec les exigences d’une « approche de la recherche aussi appropriée que possible d’un point de vue pratique et universitaire. » Dans le cadre de mes recherches, cela s’est traduit par une hiérarchisation de la collecte des données empiriques en raison des opportunités particulières qui se sont présentées à moi à l’époque. 

En tant que chercheur social, surtout lorsqu’on est engagé dans ce qu’on peut appeler un « méso-niveau » d’analyse, il est essentiel de comprendre sa propre position dans le processus de recherche et d’avancer à pas de loup dans l’enchevêtrement de sujets ciblés pour l’analyse, de reconnaître également les contributions, qu’il s’agisse d’indicateurs ou qu’elles revêtent la forme d’idées nouvelles ou particulières.

Au final, la question du type de recherche que je mène sera avant tout de savoir quelle est la contribution apportée par les résultats et les interprétations au débat sur la revitalisation à notre échelle locale. L’intérêt dans ce cas est d’ordre pratique et la tâche à effectuer consiste à montrer comment certains niveaux d’abstraction peuvent encore être des questions pratiques, alimentant ainsi le débat ontologique d’un point de vue théorique et pratique.

Il incombe donc au chercheur de « savoir répondre ». Une théorie doit par conséquent chercher à ébaucher une syntaxe de communication qui, à condition que le chercheur ne souhaite pas restreindre la théorie à une simple analyse, rend son applicabilité véritablement possible, sans être naturellement englobée dans la syntaxe de l’objet de l’étude en question.

La tâche concomitante à effectuer consiste désormais à établir le cadre théorique du processus de recherche. Cette tâche doit être un processus réitératif, surtout si l’on tient compte du fait que les recherches disponibles sur les villes de Folkestone et de Margate, mais aussi dans les villes côtières plus généralement ou sur la revitalisation des petites villes sont très limitées. Bien que l’envergure soit pertinente dans ce cas, il n’est pas nécessaire de devoir choisir entre les théories sociologiques au niveau macro-structurel ou de micro-organisme. À cette étape particulière de la recherche, insister pour annoncer la couleur d’une école théorique ou d’une autre ne serait qu’une invitation à « percevoir chaque phénomène comme un clou car l’outil théorique choisi est un marteau », pour paraphraser Kaplan ou Maslow. C’est-à-dire, à moins que quelqu’un ne souscrive à l’idée que la recherche empirique doit être orientée à travers l’objectif des concepts théoriques afin de la soumettre à la possibilité d’une falsification. L’inverse est cependant également vrai : il serait trompeur d’écarter complètement les approches théoriques entourant les rapports de propriété (Zukin, 1982) ou la « classe créative » (Florida, 2004). Il apparaît clairement que le droit de propriété, qui représente le capital, doit jouer un rôle important dans l’avenir des efforts de revitalisation et également dans la manière dont les acteurs culturels se sont pris au jeu. Il existe également de nettes différences entre Folkestone et Margate, en partie en raison des développements historiques et en partie en raison des intérêts philanthropiques d’un individu en particulier. Cependant, transposer les études analytiques des propriétés loft à New York (ou Londres, Newcastle ou Liverpool par ailleurs) à celles de Folkestone et Margate serait d’une utilisation restreinte, particulièrement en raison des pressions économiques de l’investissement immobilier, considérablement différent dans la plupart des stations balnéaires britanniques par rapport aux grandes villes et aux capitales des sociétés occidentales, du moins depuis les années 1970. Dans le même ordre d’idées, il ne fait aucun doute que l’attraction exercée par les préférences culturelles, l’implication et les investissements des professionnels générée dans certains endroits peut contribuer de manière significative aux efforts de revitalisation urbaine, avec ou sans les effets multiplicateurs ou de déplacement des autres catégories professionnelles et résidents, mais il n’est pas du tout certain que la même contribution puisse être bénéfique aux petites villes côtières et sur quelle durée. Il est prouvé que les raisons pour lesquelles les professionnels déménagent vers des villes plus petites comprennent des facteurs tels que « la proximité de la métropole », « l’absence d’une tradition ouvrière », des industries culturelles « fortement subventionnées par ou organisées autour d’institutions publiques », « certains types d’équipements urbains et naturels » ainsi que le « niveau de la population du troisième âge » bénéficiant de revenus disponibles pour la consommation culturelle (voir Denis-Jacob, 2012). Mais ces descriptions ne font pas tout.

Margate et Folkestone, deux villes côtières dont les histoires divergent un peu, connaissent un déclin social et économique depuis un certain moment, sans aucun doute depuis les années 1970, ce qui s’est traduit par un taux de chômage élevé et une privation supérieure à la moyenne. Depuis les années 1990, les divers efforts de revitalisation n’ont eu qu’un effet limité. L’idée de la « culture » comme moteur ou outil de la revitalisation a été prise en compte dans le récit des deux villes par plusieurs parties prenantes. Ma recherche s’attarde sur a) la déconstruction de ces récits et b) l’effet des différents rapports de force des deux villes. L’une de ces villes, Folkestone, bénéficie d’une participation financière et conceptuelle significative grâce à un individu privé et l’autre, Margate, présente un contexte quelque peu différent. Les questions, les groupes cibles et l’approche de ma recherche reflètent cette vision (voir le Tableau 1 ci-dessous). Cependant, Margate n’est pas nécessairement contraire à Folkestone ni vice-versa. Les villes permettent d’établir une comparaison intéressante entre les différents cas de figures possibles tout en faisant toutes deux référence à la culture dans leurs efforts respectifs de revitalisation.

Les quatre questions suivantes, associées aux méthodes de recherche utilisées jusqu’à présent, orientent ma recherche.

Question de recherche n °1 : Quels sont les récits à propos de la revitalisation culturelle de Folkestone et Margate ? (y compris les facteurs nécessaires pour envisager la revitalisation)

MÉTHODE

  • Analyse documentaire
  • Analyse de documents de politique générale et autres
  • Analyse médiatique
  • Flâneries/balades à visée psycho-géographique
  • Enquête en ligne
  • Entretiens

GROUPE CIBLE

  • Résidents locaux et propriétaires d’entreprises générales
  • Visiteurs et secteur des loisirs
  • Médias/experts
  • Décideurs/leaders/faiseurs d’opinion
  • Opérateurs

Question de recherche n °2 : Les récits de revitalisation qui font référence aux secteurs créatifs et culturels sont-ils comparés à d’autres investissements ?

MÉTHODE

  • Analyse documentaire
  • Analyse de documents de politique générale et autres
  • Analyse médiatique
  • Enquête en ligne
  • Entretiens

GROUPE CIBLE

  • Résidents locaux et propriétaires d’entreprises générales
  • Visiteurs et secteur des loisirs
  • Médias/experts
  • Décideurs/leaders/faiseurs d’opinion
  • Opérateurs


Question de recherche n °3 : Quel est le degré d’influence qu’exercent réellement les secteurs créatifs et culturels sur la revitalisation des deux villes côtières ?

MÉTHODE

  • Analyse documentaire
  • Analyse de documents de politique générale et autres
  • Analyse médiatique
  • Enquête en ligne
  • Entretiens

GROUPE CIBLE

  • Décideurs/leaders/faiseurs d’opinion
  • Opérateurs
  • Médias/experts

Question de recherche n °4 : Quelles sont les différences entre la revitalisation générée par la culture à l’échelle privée (philanthrope) et publique ?

MÉTHODE

  • Analyse documentaire
  • Analyse de documents de politique générale et autres
  • Entretiens

GROUPE CIBLE

  • Décideurs/leaders/faiseurs d’opinion
  • Opérateurs
  • Médias/experts

Une grande partie de l’approche de la recherche n’opère ici qu’au niveau cognitif. Il est surprenant que la recherche sociologique mettant à profit notre gamme complète de sens afin d’apprécier pleinement tous les aspects des relations sociales dans le temps et dans l’espace ne soit pas plus aboutie. Cette limite, que l’on pourrait comparer à un capitaine qui ne sort jamais son navire hors des frontières sécurisées du port, peut dans ce cas être abordée en se promenant dans les rues de la ville de l’étude, en engageant spontanément la conversation, en observant le tissu historique et en « échauffant » les esprit inquisiteurs. Avec d’éventuelles références nostalgiques à des auteurs comme Rousseau et Goethe, ainsi qu’aux récits qui émergent dans les villes elles-mêmes (voir Jarvis et Bonnett, 2013), il est important que cet observateur maintienne un sens de l’auto-critique quant à sa propre surveillance des espaces publics. Le rôle de l’observateur peut être compensé par des promenades de groupe semi-structurées à visée exploratrice, la « balade psycho-géographique », qui peut déboucher sur des observations pertinentes (sans qu’elles ne se transforment nécessairement en recherche ethnographique) et des dialogues animés.

Dans le cadre de ma recherche, j’utilise les deux approches, les questions d’entretien, les analyses et l’interprétation des données, afin de parvenir à une meilleure « impression » du sujet. « La clé ne réside pas dans la reproduction du nomadisme urbain romantique… mais dans la génération des « ailleurs »…, autant de boîtes à outils conceptuelles (et mutables) pour élargir les possibilités d’addition et de soustraction, en fonction des besoins pratiques et théoriques, à la fois art du souvenir et paysage réel, physique, commémoré, à la fois assassinat du cadavre situationniste et outil de survie pour échapper à son destin, le « gros plan » qui finalement endort non pas le cadavre, mais la nécessité de continuer à l’endormir en l’assassinant, qui reporte notre rencontre indéfiniment, une formation pour des trajectoires de mauvaise augure et plus périlleuses. » (Smith 2010 : 120)

L’auteur est convaincu que la recherche sociologique doit s’ériger en processus réitératif (comme il a déjà été mentionné ci-dessus), en traitant le sujet via différentes méthodes, malgré les défis présentés. Il est important d’accueillir la vérité sans manifester d’inhibition ni d’intimidation face aux préceptes méthodologiques, tout en étant conscient. L’application en elle-même est un processus d’apprentissage (la devise d’« apprentissage par la pratique » n’est pas moins inappropriée dans ce cas que lorsqu’il s’agit d’apprendre à faire du vélo). À travers ce processus réitératif, il sera possible de bâtir une carte significative des résultats générés par la gamme des approches de recherche employées. Au cœur de la carte figurent les interdépendances et les « interdépendances involontaires » qui en résultent (Elias 1978 : 94) du sujet. « Ces personnes constituent des réseaux d’interdépendances ou des figurations en tout genre, caractérisées par toutes sortes de rapports de force, tels que les familles, les écoles, les villes, les classes sociales ou les états » (ibid : 15) pendant un moment. En planifiant les récits par rapport aux quatre principales questions de la recherche, un « champ » (Bourdieu, 1998) de « liaisons fonctionnelles » (Elias, 1978) émergera ainsi qu’une évaluation de l’augmentation ou de la diminution de la « différenciation ou de l’intégration fonctionnelle ». La mesure dans laquelle les récits font partie des différentes figurations sera établie et contribuera à développer des hypothèses. D’autres sous-questions telles que « Margate et Folkestone représentent-elles un « objet d’identification commune » ? Comment les personnes nouent-elles des liens avec ces villes ? » ou « La référence à la culture masque-t-elle les véritables tâches de revitalisation d’un côté tout en servant à consolider les efforts des gens de l’autre ? Et, le cas échéant, dans quelle mesure ? ». Ce genre d’analyse contribue à entreprendre de révéler des liens méconnus jusqu’alors. Selon Elias, l’objectif consiste à dresser le portrait de la manière dont la configuration précédente a conduit à ou a représenté la condition nécessaire de la configuration actuelle et de leur expérience dans les différentes villes. Le modèle de figuration place les personnes et leurs relations au cœur et c’est uniquement à partir de ces relations que le changement peut être interprété comme indiquant des liaisons fonctionnelles et des rapports de force. « Qui ont été, sont et sont en passe de devenir les groupes d’influence dans ces villes et quelles sont les tensions structurelles ? » Même si l’objectif d’Elias de « comprendre afin de contrôler les relations sociales » (transposition de l’idée selon laquelle le but des sciences naturelles consiste à contrôler la nature) peut désormais être considéré comme quelque peu naïf ou déplacé, l’utilisation d’un « outil » capable de capturer la structure du changement social à différents niveaux est particulièrement utile à ma recherche, sans entrer dans le débat de « la structure par opposition à l’action » ni discuter des nodules fonctionnels qui tendent à un « système harmonieux ». « ... analyse et synopsis de la configuration font partie intégrante de nombreuses demandes sociologiques. Elles jouent un rôle, par exemple, dans le façonnement de modèles à l’échelle la plus grande comme la plus petite… on les trouve dans le développement, la construction et la révision de l’hypothèse et des théories sociologiques » (Elias, 1994 : 8).

L’« agence » dans l’analyse de données et de récits peut être capturée de manière utile ici grâce au concept d’« habitus » de Bourdieu. « …l’espace des positions sociales est retranscrit dans un espace de prises de positions grâce à la médiation de l’espace des dispositions (ou habitus) » (1998 : 7). Dans le contexte particulier de la revitalisation d’un avenir anticipé (meilleur) comme récit émergent à l’effet d’auto-régulation, le concept d’habitus dynamique peut être employé utilement : « L’habitus enferme la solution des paradoxes du sens objectif sans intention subjective. Si chacun des moments de la séquence d’actions ordonnées et orientées qui constituent les stratégies objectives peut paraître déterminé par l’anticipation de l’avenir et en particulier de ses propres conséquences…, c’est parce que les pratiques engendrées par l’habitus et régies par les conditions passées de production de leur principe génératif sont adaptées en avance aux conditions objectives dès lors que les conditions dans lesquelles les fonctions de l’habitus demeurent identiques, ou semblables, aux conditions de sa constitution. L’ajustement aux conditions objectives est en effet parfaitement réussi et l’illusion de la finalité ou, ce qui revient au même, du mécanisme auto-réglé » (Bourdieu, 1990 : 62).

En confinant le sujet dans une mesure telle qu’il est encore possible d’en parler de manière significative sans succomber aux théories généralisées des forces sociales (dont les indices localisés sont purement représentatifs), tout en évitant un degré de particularisme qui rendrait l’analyse sociologique superflue, le résultat est que les approches sociologiques d’Elias et de Bourdieu constituent un outil adéquat pour ma recherche. Pour une comparaison intéressante d’Elias et de Bourdieu, se reporter à Paulle, van Heerikhuizen et Emirbayer, 2012.

A ce niveau, pour des raisons pratiques et de « recherche en tant que praxis », ma recherche a été « une tentative d’un point de vue théorique ». La majorité de la littérature théorique qui porte sur la revitalisation urbaine ne peut pas être simplement écartée ni même entièrement appliquée aux configurations sociales de Folkestone et Margate. Certains aspects, cependant, doivent faire l’objet d’une référence précise, tels que les questions de gouvernance du développement urbain (« la notion de gouvernance est devenue critique », Jones et Evans, 2006, p. 1492), des parcs commerciaux hors des villes et de leur effet sur les centres-villes (Thomas et Bromley, 2002), du logement (Waddington, 2005) et de l’inhabituel (McGuinness et al., 2012), de la nostalgie du lieu (Jarvis et Bonnett, 2013) ou de l’innovation de la planification (Nyseth, Pløger et Holm, 2010) ou en effet du langage de la revitalisation lui-même (Harrison, 2013).

 

Download Uwe Derksen's reportCulture-led regeneration in Folkestone and Margate.